How COVID-19 Affects Diabetes

By: Portia Wofford

Physicians, scientists, and researchers are still learning about COVID-19 and its effects on the body. As they study the impact coronavirus has on different illnesses and disease processes, diabetes is getting attention. The CDC notes that having Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes increases your risk of severe illness from COVID-19. Because people with diabetes are at an increased risk for developing infections, they should take precautions to protect themselves against COVID-19.

Complications from diabetes related to COVID-19

Currently, there isn’t enough research or evidence to prove that diabetics are at an increased risk for COVID-19. However, if your diabetes isn’t well-controlled, you could have worse complications if you contract coronavirus. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), when diabetics don’t manage their diabetes and blood sugars, they are at risk for diabetes- related complications. Additionally, other conditions —such as heart or lung disease — and diabetes worsens the chance of you getting sick from COVID-19 because your body’s immune system is compromised. A recent study showed patients with COVID-19 and diabetes who had high blood sugars were more likely to have longer hospital stays.

If you do get COVID-19, the virus could put you at higher risk for sepsis  and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Sepsis is a complication of COVID-19, which causes widespread inflammation throughout your body and can shut down organs. DKA happens when high levels of acid (ketones) are in your blood.

  • It’s hard to manage your fluid and electrolytes level in DKA.
  • DKA makes it difficult to maintain your fluid and electrolyte levels.
  • This makes treating sepsis hard because DKA causes you to lose electrolytes.

In addition to diabetes-related complications, diabetics also have a risk of developing other complications of COVID-19, such as pneumonia, organ failure, and kidney injury.

Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and Coronavirus

According to the CDC, people at any age with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19. Based on the CDC, the ADA warns that people with Type 1 or gestational diabetes might also be at an increased risk. The ADA states it’s important for any person with either type of diabetes to manage their diabetes. Those who already have diabetes-related health problems are likely to have worse outcomes if they contract COVID-19 than diabetics who are otherwise healthy.

Tips to avoid infection

  1. Stay home as much as possible
  2. Monitor your blood sugar regularly. Maintaining optimal blood glucose, as determined by your healthcare team, is important in preventing severe complications to COVID-19.
  3. Wash your hands
  4. Avoid sick people
  5. Wear a mask
  6. Check-in with your doctors, via telehealth. Most providers schedule telehealth visits—rather than in-person visits. Ask your provider if he or she offers this service.
  7. Exercise. Try exercising at home. Walk around your neighborhood, but be sure to social distance. Right now, there are exercises and workout plans online where you can follow along.
  8. Wash your hands. Wash your hand with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. Keep alcohol-based hand sanitizer with you as well.
  9. Wear a mask and social distance. CDC recommends at least 6 feet apart.
  10. Eat a healthy diet:
  • Eat foods low in sugar
  • Limit foods high in sugar, carbohydrates, and fat
  • Try lean proteins instead of fried foods
  • Don’t forget your green, leafy vegetables

If your glucose readings change because of changes in your diet and activity level, speak with your healthcare team before making any adjustments to your insulin or other medications.

Your COVID-19 diabetes plan

Because of social distancing and shelter-in-place rules, it may be harder for you to get your supplies.

Stock up on enough supplies to last you for a couple of weeks, in case you get quarantined:

  • Healthy food
  • Simple carbs like honey, fruit juice, or hard candies in case your blood sugar dips
  • Make sure you have a 30 day supply of insulin and other medicine
  • Extra strips and batteries for your glucometer
  • Extra glucagon and ketone strips
  • Diabetes alert bracelet or necklace

Keep your home health team updated on your plans, and if you notice any COVID-19 symptoms be sure to alert your home health nurse.

What to do if you get sick

Be sure you know the signs and symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Cough, shortness of breath, or difficulty breathing
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Fever or chills
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Muscle or body aches

Notify your Hearts Home Health nurse , with your most recent blood glucose readings, if you have any of these symptoms. Symptoms can range from mild to severe illness, and appear 2-14 days after exposure to COVID-19.

Portia Wofford is an award-winning nurse, writer, and digital marketer. After dedicating her nursing career to creating content and solutions for employers that affected patient outcomes, these days Portia empowers health related businesses to grow their communities through engaging content that connects and converts. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter for her latest.

Safe Activities to Enjoy While Social Distancing

Due to COVID-19, more and more Americans are practicing social distancing. While working at home, schooling from home, and sheltering in place, it’s understandable to wish for a simpler time when you could leave the house or interact with others outside of your household without worry. With new recommendations from the White House to continue social distancing through at least April 30, it’s more important than ever add a variety of entertainment to your life to keep yourself from feeling stir crazy. Here is a list of activities to help pass the time at a socially responsible distance:

  1. Utilize social media and video apps to stay connected to friends and family. Skype, FaceTime, Google Hangouts and Zoom are all video options you can use to connect with your long-distance friends.
  2. Walk, jog, hike or bike outdoors (while practicing social distancing from others).
  3. Read your neighborhood forums to see what types of social-distancing activities they have in place. For example, many neighborhoods are participating in bear hunts, where community members place teddy bears in windows so that kids can look for and count bears during their walks.
  4. Take a virtual tour of the Yellowstone National Park: https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/photosmultimedia/virtualtours.htm. Many parks, aquariums, and zoos are offering free online tours or virtual experiences at this time.
  5. Write letters to your friends, family, nursing homes, and first responders.
  6. Do some spring cleaning.
  7. Play cards, board games or do a puzzle with your immediate family.
  8. Cook dinner – make a pizza from scratch or try a recipe that you’ve never made before because it was time-consuming.
  9. Join an online book club or meet with your friends virtually to discuss a book.
  10. Take a nap.
  11. Watch a movie or your favorite TV series on Netflix.
  12. Dig out your old coloring books. Coloring isn’t just for kids!
  13. Call the elderly people in your life and check on them. This would be a great time to interview your grandparents to learn more about their lives.
  14. Make a photobook online by uploading your favorite pictures from this past year.
  15. Buy gift cards from your favorite local businesses to use after social-distancing ends.

Let’s make the best out of this current situation by staying positive and being responsible. Spread the love, not COVID-19!

A Letter from Our CEO on COVID-19

Our Continued Diligence to Patient Care

  • Abode Healthcare has hired an infectious disease physician as an expert resource to help guide our decisions related to prevention and management of COVID-19.
  • All employees of Abode Healthcare have been re-educated on infection control, proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE), as well as effective handwashing techniques.
  • Abode Healthcare has implemented new policies and procedures related to PPE and all medical equipment to decrease the potential for disease transmission.
  • As a company, we have revised and implemented new ways for communication to take place within the leadership of our company to ensure that any and all important information is distributed, received and acted upon in a timely manner.
  • Abode Healthcare has developed a national two-level screening process for our patients.
    • Level one is a screening tool that is used for ALL of our patients.
    • Level two is an enhanced screening tool that is implemented in areas where there are confirmed cases of COVID-19.
  • Nationwide, Abode has implemented a screening process that takes place daily for our employees to decrease the risk for any transmission of the disease.
  • We have developed and implemented use of the Abode’s Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan, created specifically for our agency based on current recommendations from the CDC and the WHO.
    • This is a dynamic tool that will we will continue to revise and adapt as the situation evolves.
  • Abode Healthcare has secured necessary supplies for infection control practices as we continue to monitor and purchase more to effectively replenish our stocks.
  • Each of our locations has performed a live “mock” training event across every Abode agency with all employees to review our plans, discuss our specific roles, and ensure that every employee feels confident during this time to continue to provide the best care to our patients.
    • Confidence and dedication to patient care is key!
  • For patients being treated in Nursing Facilities with restricted access to outside visitors, we have implemented the following procedures:
    • Abode Healthcare has developed a remote visit for visits other than nursing, that can be done via phone with the patient, the caregiver, and with a representative at the facility that can provide information to us in order to collaborate on their plan of care.
    • Remote visits are available for social worker, chaplain, and music therapy visits.
    • The patients, families, caregivers, and physicians will be updated of any changes to the frequency or type of services we are allowed to provide.

Our dedication to our patients and family members during this time of need is our focus. We are here. Please let us know how we can help assist in any way with any patient in need during this time.

The Why, When, and How of Handwashing:

According to the Center for Disease Control, handwashing is your best defense against the spread of germs.

The CDC recommends washing your hands before, during, and after prepping food; before eating; before and after caring for a loved one; before and after treating a cut or wound; after using the toilet; after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; after touching an animal or animal waste; after touching garbage; or after changing a diaper or cleaning up after a child.

Also consider washing your hands after touching surfaces in a public space; before and after work; and after using public transportation.

What is the best hand washing technique?

Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds – the same amount of time it takes to sing the Happy Birthday song twice.

  1. Wet your hands.
  2. Apply soap and lather well.
  3. Scrub your hands, including the backs of your hands and in between your fingers. If you’re wearing a ring, make sure to scrub underneath it!
  4. Rinse your hands well.
  5. Dry your hands.

If you do not have access to soap and water, consider a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover your hands with the hand sanitizer and rub your hands together until your hands are dry.

Try to avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth, but especially with unwashed hands.

For more information on the science behind washing your hands, visit:

https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/show-me-the-science-handwashing.html

 

Celebrating the Holidays when a Loved One is in Hospice

This time of year can be challenging for those who have a terminally ill loved one. If this friend or family member is in hospice, the holiday season may feel “off” or a little less joyous this year.

While there are certainly challenges you will have to face, there are still ways you and your family can celebrate the season with your loved one in hospice. We’re here to provide you with some encouragement to navigate this time of year.

Coordinate with hospice staff.

Those working in hospice are not just there for the patients during this time, they are also there for the families. Hospice staff serve as a crucial resource for trying times like these and are more than willing to assist. They can help coordinate visiting schedules to work around holiday events, offer suggestions for support groups, and make arrangements for any holiday traditions you’d like to celebrate with your loved one. Among many other tasks, hospice staff are there to aid you this holiday season.

Adjust your holiday traditions.

While it may seem difficult to change any holiday traditions you have to better suit your loved one in hospice, just know that it will be wroth it. Including your loved ones in these traditions is what the season is all about, so making certain they are a part of some of the traditions you enjoy the most will bring everyone closer together and create a special meaning this year.

Above all, enjoy time with your loved ones.

We know this may sound hard – maybe even impossible. It’s important to use this time to bring everyone together and create memories while you can. Surrounding yourself with friends and family can serve as a reminder that you are not alone in this process.

We’ll leave you with this question – What’s your reason for this season? Is it to cherish another holiday with your loved one?

Keeping Dignity | Caregiver Tips

Your loved one can no longer do the many tasks they once could. They now depend on you for many of these things. The easiest solution may be to simply take over and make decision, but it’s important to be respectful of your loved ones. As a caregiver, you want to protect your loved one’s dignity and sense of self-worth.

Put yourself in their shoes. Imagine if your independence had slipped away. You can no longer drive, walk, or get out of bed. These once simple tasks now require help from someone else. How would this make you feel? You may feel frustrated. This loss of freedom would most likely cause you to want to keep control over as much as you possibly could.

Here are some helpful suggestions:

  • Put yourself in your loved one’s place. How would you want to be treated if you were being cared for?
  • Educate yourself on your loved one’s condition. This can prepare you for what’s ahead.
  • Help them do what they can on their own for as long as possible. This will give them a sense of control.
  • Talk openly and honestly with your loved one. Try to involve them in decisions and be a good listener.
  • Be flexible. Try an accommodate reasonable requests if you can.
  • Give positive feedback if your loved one does a task on their own.